As the walls that once housed the fuel containers of a small, EDF-controlled fuel depot fall and trigger a chain reaction of viscerally beautiful explosions before me, a solitary thought dominates my mind: I did this, and I did it alone. No scripting help from the game engine, no computer-controlled character holding my hand and telling me where to place charges and when to run, and no loss of control in the form of a cut-scene – and it is in this independence that Red Faction: Guerilla finds its apex.

cut deeper, keep reading>>

Via Rock, Paper, Shotgun [PC Gaming since 1873]: This is what happens when the Something Awful goons (Goons?) play an MMO.  Below, the video, and why it is important.
cut deeper, keep reading>>

It would seem that Team Fortress 2 is updating the game with .. a new class?!  Some details below the cut.

cut deeper, keep reading>>

I hated fighting against warriors. More than warlocks with their infernal Fear spell and life-leeching abilities, and vastly more than mages, with their devious blinking and Flame-Blasting ways. Even more than coming up against the hunter, whom was arguably designed to be a direct counter to beloved Seris – my rogue in World of Warcraft. The hunter was able to launch a flare into the air, which could pull Seris out of stealth and more than likely lead to her death. The hunter could place a mark on Seris when he saw her, preventing her from slinking back into the shadows she called comfortable, allowing him to see her no matter where she went or how craftily she hid. The hunter even could even train and command an animal pet, beasts pulled from the foulest corners of Azeroth, and then send them to slay me while he disabled the abilities I relied on.

But none of them – whether it be another rogue, an implacable paladin, or even the dreaded hunter – could instill in me the raw, unrelenting hatred that seeing a warrior could.
cut deeper, keep reading>>


So pretty soon one of my most beloved game franchises will be releasing a small expansion/DLC via Steam.  It’s to be set at 10$, and its focus seems to be primarily five new Native American factions.  Those five being the Iroquois, Huron, Plains, Pueblo and Cherokee nations, some of the more prominent and, well, warlike of First Nations Americans.  And by warlike I mean, not quite as willing to sit docilely by while European interests raped their lands.  Below the cut: some thoughts and concerns about what Creative Assemblies has already mucked up with the franchise.

cut deeper, keep reading>>

Any given sentence contains within its confines a host of meanings; that of the topical definition of the sum of words, that of an intended idea implied both in and around the meanings established through topical definition and, often, as a consequence of this composite, a potentially unintended meaning.  I personally hold that any given writer or speaker is responsible for the overall understanding of his words, whether intended or not.  Generally, this holds up well enough in the day-to-day life of reading and hearing and understanding through transitions between media types do not prove difficult.  With this in mind, I’ve chosen to look at a presumably unintended implication of a particular computer game: Command and Conquer: Generals.

cut deeper, keep reading>>

As has probably been fairly obvious, I’m completely enamoured with Heroes of Newerth and have been in the closed beta for awhile.  As a result of this, beta testers are occasionally given extra keys to invite other players into the game – and I’ve come across an extra key that ONE OF YOU JUST MIGHT GET! Read below the cut for more.

cut deeper, keep reading>>

Introductory post for class – gone as soon as credit is received.

Here are some things that I want to explore over the semester:

1: Can narrative be an actual game mechanic? 1a: how, exactly, is a game mechanic defined?  Is this a flexible or rigid definition, or has it even been solidly established yet?

cut deeper, keep reading>>

S8Game-F 2009-08-19 00-29-31-04
So I’ve spent the last week or so pretty heavily engrossed with Timegate’s new futurewar runey-jumpey-shootey game, Section 8 – and it’s great. It has all of the elements of a FPS game that I’ve been hunting for awhile now: jet-packs, loud, badass-feeling guns, and a selection of loadouts with which to kit your generic robotic-like futurewar soldier avatar to make him a bit closer to your ideal. In other words, I’ve been looking for the next version of Tribes 2 – and in this, Section 8 does not disappoint. Click through for my overly-lengthly thoughts on the open beta.

cut deeper, keep reading>>

To borrow a device from Kieron Gillen: Ser1s was the first one that made it.
I had spent the gaming hours of the better part of a week before I had managed to create a character in the wonderful Mount & Blade that survived for longer than a week of in-game time. Ser1s’ creation – which was done quickly, as I assumed that she would be destroyed as quickly as any of the tens of others that had come before her – achieved two things that her priors had not, and each lead equally to her survival in Calradia.

cut deeper, keep reading>>